Currently Browsing: Energy Efficiency

5 Home Cooling Tips

Cover WindowsSummer can be tough for families who find their house not close to cool enough even if the air-conditioner system runs on full blast. To make matters worse, using the AC on top levels will certainly have its effects on your energy bill. Thankfully, there are ways to help cool your home down.

Because of climate change, we can experience weather conditions in extremes. It gets super cold during the winter and extra-hot during the summer. But no matter the weather outside, you can have a more comfortable home with these cooling tips:

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Attic Insulation Tips for Warmer Winters

Attic InsulationThere’s always enough time left before winter arrives, for as long as you schedule your home improvements right. Use this time correctly to prepare your home for the winter before it is too late. Attic insulation can help you keep your house warmer during winter and save electricity used by room heaters.

Attic insulation is the preferred insulator for homeowners looking for savings. The attic insulation can maintain the warm temperature of your house and control the utility consumption. The insulator works by making house air-leak proof. The insulator traps the warmth or temperature of the room through its air-leak proof property. (more…)

How Attic Insulation Reduces Your Home Energy Bills

Attic InsulationOne may think that if no one really uses the attic at home or wouldn’t even go up there at all, then why is insulation even needed? No one will feel the heat or cold there anyway. Truth is, your attic’s temperature affects the overall temperature of the rest of your home. And yes, it does have an effect on energy costs.

Attic insulation installation may cost a bit of money at first but it is definitely an investment worth having. It is also very important to mention that you shouldn’t go cheap on installation by trying to do DIYs. It is best to call experts to get it done for you as attic insulation mistakes are very common. With improper installation, you may be finding yourself spending even more money than you first intended.

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Using Radiant Barriers

Radiant barrier is a type of heat insulation that looks like a shiny foil sheet. It is often used during construction workUsing Radiant Barriers to reflect heat but can also be installed in the attic of a house to prevent radiation as it works well in closed and narrow spaces.

The attic is the top covering of a house. In hot weather, the attic gets extremely hot and passes the heat to the house. The temperature of the attic and of the house, however, can be controlled by installing radiant barriers sheet. Heat waves flow from hotter region to the cooler region. The radiant barriers work as an obstacle creating it difficult for heat waves to pass through it and enter the house through the roof.  The radiant barriers require airspace in front of them to work.  They may become heat conductor if placed in-between the two pieces of siding. Besides, any dust accumulated on the barrier sheet may reduce its ability to reflect heat.

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Insulation Options for an Efficient House Plan

When putting together plans for a home, attention must be given to every detail. While your focus might be on making sure you have enough closet space or that your garage has enough space to include a small workshop for your hobbies, there is more you need to plan for than just what you can see. What you can’t see behind the walls is important as well. You need to plan for insulation.

According to U.S. Department of Energy statistics, homeowners can cut their energy costs as much as 20% when their homes are properly insulated. Where you reside in the country plays a big part in what type and how much insulation you’ll need for your home. For instance, take a typical home design. If that home was built in Arizona, it is going to have different insulation needs than the same home built in Delaware because the climate in each place is unique to that particular environment.

With differences in house styles and plans, as well as the varying degrees of climate throughout the country, special attention needs to be paid to your choice of insulation for the house during the planning stages. There is no single option available to you. Knowing the differences and choosing the right one can save you money on your heating and cooling costs.

Let’s first take a look at the considerations for choosing home insulation. Depending on where you live in the United States, you’ll have to consider the R value for your walls, floors, ceilings, basement and crawl spaces. The higher the R value, the better the material used as insulation can impede air from flowing through the walls or cavity the insulation is in.

Living in the desert heat of Arizona or a similar climate, you’ll need a high R value to keep the heat out of your house and keep cooling costs down in the summer months. Living in the mountains of Wyoming you’ll also want extra insulation with a high R value to keep the heat in your house in the winter. In milder climates, or where the temperature doesn’t fluctuate to the extremes, a lower R value can be used.

Different types of roof designs can also change the amount of insulation needed for a home and will need to be planned for in the early design stages. For instance, if the home has an attic, thick batt insulation can be used to obtain the correct R value needed to reach building codes to heat or cool the house effectively. You don’t need to consider the thickness of the roofing studs because there is plenty of room for the insulation to sit in the attic space.

However, if you have a room that is full of glass windows or has cathedral ceilings, you’ll need to either put in wider roofing studs that will accommodate the thickness of batt insulation you’ll need to come up to building code, or you’ll need to choose another insulation option that will give you the same R value of the smaller roofing stud. This is particularly important in homes with cathedral ceilings and Cape Cod style homes where there is a sloped ceiling on the second floor.

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